Brother, can you spare a billion? : (Record no. 7412)

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001 - CONTROL NUMBER
control field 19377498
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control field OSt
005 - DATE AND TIME OF LATEST TRANSACTION
control field 20180403160456.0
008 - FIXED-LENGTH DATA ELEMENTS--GENERAL INFORMATION
fixed length control field 161117s2017 nyua 000 0 eng
010 ## - LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CONTROL NUMBER
LC control number 2016022373
020 ## - INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER
International Standard Book Number 9780190605766 (hardback)
040 ## - CATALOGING SOURCE
Original cataloging agency DLC
Language of cataloging eng
Transcribing agency DLC
Description conventions rda
Modifying agency DLC
042 ## - AUTHENTICATION CODE
Authentication code pcc
043 ## - GEOGRAPHIC AREA CODE
Geographic area code n-us---
050 00 - LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CALL NUMBER
Classification number HJ8119
Item number .M35 2017
082 00 - DEWEY DECIMAL CLASSIFICATION NUMBER
Classification number 332.1/52
Edition number 23
084 ## - OTHER CLASSIFICATION NUMBER
Classification number POL011000
-- POL024000
-- POL011020
Number source bisacsh
100 1# - MAIN ENTRY--PERSONAL NAME
Personal name McDowell, Daniel,
Relator term author.
245 10 - TITLE STATEMENT
Title Brother, can you spare a billion? :
Remainder of title the United States, the IMF, and the international lender of last resort /
Statement of responsibility, etc. Daniel McDowell Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs Syracuse University.
264 #1 - PRODUCTION, PUBLICATION, DISTRIBUTION, MANUFACTURE, AND COPYRIGHT NOTICE
Place of production, publication, distribution, manufacture New York :
Name of producer, publisher, distributor, manufacturer Oxford University Press,
Date of production, publication, distribution, manufacture, or copyright notice [2017]
300 ## - PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION
Extent xvii, 224 pages :
Other physical details illustrations ;
Dimensions 25 cm
336 ## - CONTENT TYPE
Content type term text
Content type code txt
Source rdacontent
337 ## - MEDIA TYPE
Media type term unmediated
Media type code n
Source rdamedia
338 ## - CARRIER TYPE
Carrier type term volume
Carrier type code nc
Source rdacarrier
505 8# - FORMATTED CONTENTS NOTE
Formatted contents note Machine generated contents note: -- Table of Contents -- Table of Figures -- Table of Tables -- Preface -- List of Abbreviations -- CHAPTER 1 - Introduction -- 1. THE PUZZLE -- 2. THE ARGUMENT -- 3. PLAN OF THE BOOK and FINDINGS -- CHAPTER 2 - The ILLR in Theory and Practice -- 1. AN INTERNATIONAL LLR: A BRIEF HISTORY OF A CONCEPT -- 1.1 The ILLR and the Hegemon -- 1.2 The ILLR and the IMF -- 2. THE IMF'S LIMITATIONS AS ILLR -- 2.1. The Problem of Unresponsiveness -- 2.2. The Problem of Resource Insufficiency -- 3. THE UNITED STATES' ILLR MECHANISMS -- 3.1. The Mechanics of Currency Swaps -- 3.2. Speed and Independence -- 3.3. Lending Capacity -- 3.4. Division of Labor -- 4. CONCLUSIONS -- CHAPTER 3 - The United States Invents its Own ILLR, 1961-1962 -- 1. MORE DOLLARS, MORE PROBLEMS -- 1.1 From Dollar Gap to Dollar Glut -- 1.2. Two Threats: The "Gold Drain" and Speculation -- 2. IN SEARCH OF AN ILLR -- 2.1. The General Arrangements to Borrow -- 3. AN ALTERNATIVE ILLR: CENTRAL BANK CURRENCY SWAPS -- 3.1. The Fed's Novel Idea -- 3.2. Who Needs the IMF? -- 3.3. How the Swap Lines Protected U.S. Interests -- 3.4. Why did Europe Cooperate? -- 4. CONCLUSIONS -- CHAPTER 4 - The Exchange Stabilization Fund and the IMF in the 1980s and 1990s -- 1. THE EXCHANGE STABILIZATION FUND -- 2. 1980s: GLOBAL BANKING AND THE DEBT CRISIS -- 2.1. The IMF's "Concerted Lending" Strategy and the Problem of Unresponsiveness -- 2.2. The ESF and "Bridge Loans": Correcting for the Problem of IMF Unresponsiveness -- 3. 1990s: PORTFOLIO FLOWS AND CAPITAL ACCOUNT CRISES -- 3.1. Capital Account Crises and IMF Resource Insufficiency -- 3.2. The ESF and Supplemental Loans: Correcting for the Problem of IMF Resource Insufficiency -- 4. CONCLUSIONS -- CHAPTER 5 - Who's In, Who's Out, and Why? Selecting Whom to Bailout, 1983-1999 -- 1. U.S. FINANCIAL INTERESTS AND ESF BAILOUT SELECTION -- 2. AN EMPIRICAL MODEL OF ESF BAILOUT SELECTION -- 3. RESULTS -- 4. CONCLUSIONS -- CHAPTER 6 - U.S. International Bailouts in the 1980s and 1990s -- 1. CASE SELECTION -- 2. THE CASES -- 2.1. Mexico, Brazil and Argentina, 1982-1983 -- 2.2. Argentina, 1984 -- 2.3. Poland, 1989 -- 2.4. Mexico, 1995 -- 2.5. Thailand, 1997 -- 2.6. Indonesia and South Korea, 1997 -- 2.7. Declining Use: The ESF is Put Out to Pasture -- 3. CONCLUSIONS -- CHAPTER 7 - The United States as ILLR during the Great Panic of 2008-2009 -- 1. BACKGROUND: "A NOVEL ASPECT" OF THE GREAT PANIC OF 2008 -- 2. U.S. FINANCIAL INTERESTS AND THE FED'S ILLR ACTIONS -- 3. AN EMPIRICAL MODEL OF FED SWAP LINE SELECTION -- 4. THE INTEREST RATE THREAT AND THE FED'S ILLR ACTIONS -- 5. TRANSCRIPT ANALYSIS OF FOMC MEETINGS -- 5.1 The Initiation of the Swap Lines and the TAF, August 2007 - December 2007 -- 5.2 Incremental Expansion of Liquidity Facilities, March 2008 - August 2008 -- 5.3. Rapid Growth of the Swap Program: September 15, 2008 - October 28, 2008 -- 5.4. Swap Lines for Four Emerging Markets: October 29, 2008 -- 6. CONCLUSIONS -- CHAPTER 8 - Conclusions -- 1. CONTRIBUTIONS -- 2. THE FUTURE OF THE UNITED STATES AS ILLR -- 3. POLICY IMPLICATIONS -- 4. FINAL THOUGHTS -- BIBLIOGRAPHY -- APPENDIX.
520 ## - SUMMARY, ETC.
Summary, etc. " When financial crises occur, economic theory maintains that national economies need a lender of last resort to stabilize markets. In today's financial system, crises are rarely confined to one country-they often go global. Yet, there is no formal international lender of last resort (ILLR) to perform this function for the world economy. Conventional wisdom says that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has emerged as the de facto ILLR. However, that premise is incomplete. Brother, Can You Spare a Billion? explores how the United States has for decades regularly complemented the Fund's ILLR role by selectively providing billions of dollars in emergency loans to foreign economies in crisis. Why would U.S. policymakers ever put national financial resources at risk to "bail out" foreign governments and citizens to whom they are not beholden-especially when the IMF was created for this purpose? Daniel McDowell argues the United States has been compelled to provide such rescues unilaterally when it believes a multilateral response via the IMF is either too slow or too small to protect vital U.S. economic and financial interests. Interestingly, it does this despite the many advantages to allowing the IMF to take the lead. The United States never wanted to go into the international lending business, but in response to the IMF's chronic weaknesses, it intervenes to manage international economic crises before they can affect America's domestic economy. Through a combination of historical case studies and statistical analysis, McDowell uncovers the defensive motives behind U.S. decisions to provide global liquidity beginning in the 1960s, moving through international debt crises of the 1980s and emerging market currency crises of the 1990s, and extending up to the 2008 global financial crisis. Brother, Can You Spare a Billion? goes beyond conventional wisdom to paint a complete picture of how international financial crises have been managed and highlights the unique role that the United States has played in stabilizing the world economy in troubled times. "--
Assigning source Provided by publisher.
520 ## - SUMMARY, ETC.
Summary, etc. "This book explores how and why the U.S. has regularly acted, often alongside the IMF, as an international lender of last resort by selectively bailing out foreign economies in crisis. It highlights the unique role that the U.S. has played in stabilizing the world economy from the 1960s through 2008"--
Assigning source Provided by publisher.
610 20 - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--CORPORATE NAME
Corporate name or jurisdiction name as entry element International Monetary Fund
Geographic subdivision United States.
650 #0 - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Loans, Foreign
Geographic subdivision United States.
650 #7 - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Topical term or geographic name as entry element POLITICAL SCIENCE / International Relations / General.
Source of heading or term bisacsh
650 #7 - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Topical term or geographic name as entry element POLITICAL SCIENCE / Public Policy / Economic Policy.
Source of heading or term bisacsh
650 #7 - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Topical term or geographic name as entry element POLITICAL SCIENCE / International Relations / Trade & Tariffs.
Source of heading or term bisacsh
776 08 - ADDITIONAL PHYSICAL FORM ENTRY
Relationship information Online version:
Main entry heading McDowell, Daniel, author.
Title Brother, can you spare a billion?
Place, publisher, and date of publication New York : Oxford University Press, 2016
International Standard Book Number 9780190605773
Record control number (DLC) 2016055948
906 ## - LOCAL DATA ELEMENT F, LDF (RLIN)
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942 ## - ADDED ENTRY ELEMENTS (KOHA)
Source of classification or shelving scheme
Koha item type Books
Holdings
Current Location Date acquired Withdrawn status Damaged status Source of classification or shelving scheme Koha item type Not for loan Full call number Total Checkouts Date last checked out Price effective from Date last seen Lost status Barcode Permanent Location
Epoka University Library2018-04-03   Books HJ 8119 .M35 201712018-05-212018-04-032018-06-19 801Epoka University Library

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